Part III: Taking risks

This post is a part III of a three part blog series and RG campaign, “It Starts Today: Moving $1 Million to Black-Led, Black Liberation Organizing.” Visit our campaign webpage.

Written by Lily Andrews, bex kolins, Jason Rodney, and Jen … Continue reading »

Part II: Reparations are real

This post is a part II of a three part blog series and RG campaign, “It Starts Today: Moving $1 Million to Black-Led, Black Liberation Organizing.” Click here for more info on the campaign.

Written by Lily Andrews, bex kolins, Jason Rodney, and Jen Willsea

(Soundtrack for this post: “There’s Something Wrong With This Picture” by Galactic)

In the Resource Generation community we are going to move $1 million to Black-led organizing for Black liberation by May 20th, 2015. For many of us, this is an act of reparations.

What are reparations?

Image from http://gawker.com/what-reparations-in-america-could-look-like-1633066247

The National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America (N’COBRA) explains that reparations require governments and corporations to apologize and provide material amends for the history of slavery and white supremacy. Beyond this, N’COBRA points out that “all white people have to some extent benefited from slavery and… White Supremacy” and individuals who understand how they have benefited “if acting in good faith, would [also] contribute to reparations funds for use in assisting in the reparations process¹.”

As white wealthy individuals, reparations means redistributing our excess personal money to under-resourced Black communities, as a way to acknowledge and attempt to repair the wealth, land, and knowledge that has been stolen from Black people overall, but that has benefitted us personally². The wealth accumulated in this country, through theft of Black labor, property and dignity, has primarily benefited white communities:

  • The white owning-class produced immense wealth through chattel slavery;

  • In the 1940s and 50s, Social Security and the G.I. Bill built white wealth through privileging white beneficiaries and excluding Black people and people of color³;

  • And, less than a decade ago, Wells Fargo, among other banks, targeted Black communities across the class spectrum for subprime mortgages, essentially writing Black foreclosures into their business-plan4.

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Part I: The movement is running, and we’d better keep up

This post is a part I of a three part blog series and RG campaign, “It Starts Today: Moving $1 Million to Black-Led, Black Liberation Organizing.” Click here for more info on the campaign.

Written by: Lily Andrews, bex kolins, Jason Rodney, and Jen Willsea

http://joyeuse.deviantart.com/art/Solidarity-of-Love-55201802

Image taken from http://joyeuse.deviantart.com/art/Solidarity-of-Love-55201802

 

“We fight in the name of Aiyana Stanley-Jones, killed by Detroit Police at the age of 7 years old, who never got to graduate from elementary school. We fight in the name of Mike Brown, who was killed by officer Darren Wilson, weeks before starting college. We fight in the name of Islan Nettles, a 21 year old Black trans woman who was pummeled to death outside a NYC police station in Harlem.”

– State of the Black Union, by BlackLivesMatter¹

 

 

 

In the midst of everything, this blog post is a call to let our attention rest on one fact: the struggle for Black lives continues to move. Are we moving with it?

In the Resource Generation community, we believe this moment is a tipping point for the Black liberation movement. As four young white folks with access to wealth, and the authors of this blog post, we believe that it is incumbent that we show up and make an investment in what promises to be a pivotal moment in our lives and in the movement for Black lives.

This is why we are going to move $1 million to Black-led organizing for Black liberation by May 20th, 2015.

Are you in? Make a commitment to give and be involved.

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May 20th, 2015 would have been Mike Brown’s 19th birthday. Where were you on your 19th birthday? At college? Studying abroad? Had you already been told of the money you would inherit from your family, or had you already received your first financial gift?

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#Selma50: Investing in the Deep South Donor Delegation and Beyond

This post is a part of the blog series and RG campaign, “It Starts Today: Moving $1 Million to Black-Led, Black Liberation Organizing.” Click here for more info on the campaign.

What can we as Resource Generation members do to show up for Selma, Alabama and the U.S. South, 50 years after the height of the Civil Rights Movement shook our nation? With rampant rollbacks of hard-won civil rights victories – most notably the gutting of the Voting Rights Act; a dramatic lack of funding for grassroots organizing; aggressive attacks on immigrants; stalwart segregation; and high poverty rates, how can RG members engage in meaningful, accountable, cross-regional funding that supports the South and the rest of the country?

Selma

The delegates (missing Robyn (volunteer) and Lily (volunteer-delegate)!

These were the questions we held as a Resource Generation delegation to the 50th Anniversary of Bloody Sunday and the Voting Rights Act in Selma, Alabama, organized by the Alabama Coalition for Immigrant Justice (ACIJ). We still don’t have all the answers, but we did come away with concrete action steps, in response to our goals:

  • to seed long-term relationships between donors/funders and grassroots organizers in the South, by giving to a growing partnerships working toward Black&Brown unity
  • to foster cross-regional solidarity in funding, through hosting fundraising parties in our home cities
  • to educate ourselves about the role of the South in the national movement landscape, and to report-back to others about what we learned
  • to ground ourselves in Civil Rights history and present-day racial justice struggles.

Throughout the weekend, we studied the movement landscape of the South; investigated the current work of immigrant and African-American organizers to build Black-Brown unity; and considered our role in movement building, as donors invested in movements for racial justice at home and in Alabama. (more…)